Profitable Good Group | Good is not Sustainable if it’s not Profitable | Santa Monica, CA | The Proof
Profitable Good Group – Our Practice focuses on advising CEO’s who realize the positive P+L impact of an integrated Shared Values strategy as a competitive advantage in customer acquisition, brand building, innovation, revenue growth and employee retention.
Shared Values,Corporate Shared Values,Corporate Social Responsibility,CSV,CSR,Impact Investing,Social Business,Social Enterprise,Net Impact,Triple Bottom Line, Double Bottom Line, Collective Impact
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The Proof

Companies are delivering high net impact ROI through their Good investments, both to their P+L and their communities – creating loyal and productive employees and enlightened shareholders.

        Positive Net Impact on Business & Society

       Takes Collective Commitment and Participation

A Profitably Good Ecosystem = Sustainable ROI

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Impacting Cost and Revenue

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Powerful Revenue Impact:
Coca-Cola Brazil Increases Sales 6% via Shared Values

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Engaged Employees Stay and Are More Productive*

*(PWC 2014)

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87%

87% who are most committed to their organizations are less likely to resign – than employees who consider themselves disengaged from the corporate purpose.

57%

57% employees who are most committed to their organizations put in more effort on the job than employees who consider themselves disengaged from the corporate purpose.

Numbers Don’t Lie

Recent studies and resulting data definitively show the impact and influence of Good programming on a companies bottom line.

Buyers Hold Themselves and Their Products to Higher Standards

Consumers will engage with companies’ Good efforts, if given the opportunity

93%%

93% of consumers will have a more positive image of a company when companies support social or environmental issues

90%%

90% will be more likely to trust the company's messaging

88%%

88% will be more loyal in terms of future purchasing and brand affinity decisions

84%%

84% of global consumers say that a company’s commitment to social and environmental issues are an important consideration in deciding what to buy or where to shop

90%%

90% of global consumers would switch brands to one that is associated with a good cause, given similar price or quality

82%%

82% will recommend products and services to others depending on a brand’s commitment to social and environmental issues

89%%

89% are equally as likely to purchase a product or services from a Good brand as they are to boycott (90%) based on companies’ practice or lack of Good practices.

57%%

57% would purchase a product of lesser quality or efficacy if it is more socially or environmentally responsible

80%%

80% of consumers state they are willing to buy a product from an unknown brand if it has strong Good commitments

81%%

81% of consumers are willing to consume or purchase fewer products to preserve natural resources

Shared Values Programming Draws Top Talent

Potential employees are demanding more from their future employers

79%%

79% use a company’s commitment to social and environmental issues as a strong deciding factor in choosing where to work

62%%

62% of consumers would work for a socially or environmentally responsible company for a lower salary than at other companies

Consumers Demand Transparency & Tangible Impact

Buyers raise their expectations for companies’ Good strategies

86%%

86% believe if companies make Good commitments, they must be held accountable for producing and communicating the results

88%%

88% of consumers expect companies to substantively and consistently report on the progress of their Good efforts

64%%

64% of consumers say they only pay attention to a company’s Good efforts if an organization is going above and beyond what other companies are doing

Supportive Databank

Making the Most out of CSR

``For companies that see CSR as an opportunity to strengthen the business, the big challenge is execution. Smart partnering can provide a practical way forward.``

Read More (McKinsey)
Business with a Higher Purpose by Creating Shared Value

``While some companies already demonstrate leadership through Shared Value, this will be the challenge and the standard for leading global companies going forward.``

Read More (Fleishman Hillard, 2015)
GE is Changing the World Through Shared Values

``When senior GE executives directly engaged with the health problems of the world's poor through GE's approach to philanthropy, they saw the tremendous range of opportunities for their business.``

Read More (Fast Company)
Framing the Enterprise Mission and Objectives in a New Way

``All profits are not equal. Those that advance society are better and those that detract from society are inferior.``

Read More (HBR, 2011)
Heinz, Adidas, BMW Lead the Way in CSV

``Business managers can effectively contribute to the solution of the many complex social problems of our time. There is no higher responsibility, there is no higher duty of professional management.``

Read More (Forbes)
Doing Well by Doing Good

``Nielsen polled 30,000 consumers in 60 countries to take a pulse on conscious capitalism…“As companies drive to create greater shared value, they have to put consumers at the center and understand their expectations to develop clear and actionable sustainability strategies for their brand that will generate loyalty and improve performance.``

Read More (Nielsen, 2014)
The Keys to Employee Engagement

``Harnessing the shared values of employees, coupled with the values in the company’s culture and mission, can lead not only to greater business success, but to inspired, productive, and highly impactful people.``

Read More (PwC, 2014)
Measuring the Effects of Philanthropy

``To realize meaningful benefits, philanthropy cannot be treated as just another “check in the box,” but rather must be executed no less professionally, proactively, and strategically than other core business activities.``

Read More (Philanthropy Northwest, 2010)
Defining the Competitive and Financial Advantages of CSR/CSV

``Corporate Responsibility practices have great potential to deliver financial returns on investment as well as related business and competitive benefits. It’s not enough to engage in (shared value) activities, one must manage them…as value-creating assets.``

Read More (Project ROI, 2015)
Amplifying the Essence of the Brand as a Competitive Advantage

“A brand ideal is not social responsibility or altruism but a programme for profit and growth based on improving people’s lives.”

Read More (Consumers.net)
Stronger Metrics to Drive Differentiation and Growth

``Skepticism exists among executives and investors as to how competitive advantage and growth are actually to be driven by stronger environmental and social performance of a business. (It)is largely a matter of measurement and valuation—demonstrating to investors in particular the link between sustainable business and corporate value.``

Read More (Accenture, 2015)
A Roadmap to Successful Strategic Partnerships

``Strategic Social Partnerships help corporate, non-profit, and the public sector align social impact to business opportunities, create competitive advantages, generate shareholder value, and apply innovation to solve tough social and development problems.``

Read More (Deloitte, 2014)

Jim Stengel – Measuring the Powerful Valuation Impact of Shared Value

In November 2008, Jim Stengel left his role as Global Marketing Officer at Procter & Gamble, where he oversaw an $8 billion advertising budget and had organizational responsibility for nearly 7,000 people. Stengel left to set out on a new mission – to help grow businesses through a focus on higher ideals incorporating Shared Values.
Leading the Conversation

``The entire mission of marketing is shifting—from an era of mass and transactional to an era of engagement. Engagement marketing is about building relationships—which is much bigger than just selling a product.``

Read More (Marketo, 2015)
Stengel on What Businesses Need to Grow

``Businesses that grow faster and grow longer have something special driving them and attracting people—customers, employees…what I call an ideal… the essence of the business that is embraced by everyone including the top…``

Read More (Co.Create, 2012)
The Stengel 50 – Purpose Outperforms S+P by 400%

``I have always believed that great brands are built on improving the lives of the people they serve; I wanted to prove that maximum profit and high ideals aren’t incompatible but, in fact, inseparable.``

Read More (Businesswire, 2012)
Data Supports the Value of Ideal-Driven Businesses

``Brands that centered their businesses on the ideal of improving people’s lives resonate more with consumers—and outperform their category competitors.``

Read More (JimStengel.com, 2016)
Forward-Thinking Brands Leading the Way

``One of the most important insights…is proof that associations with ideals have a strong relationship with consumer preference, consideration and choice…``

Read More (Advertising Age, 2012)

“In the February 6, 2015, issue of the Harvard Business Review (HBR), John Chambers was recognized as one of the world’s ten best CEOs, based on Cisco’s financial performance and our impact on employees, communities, governments, and society. HBR’s analysis suggests that financial performance accounts for only 35 percent of a CEO’s legacy, whereas 65 percent is attributed to non- financial criteria, including governance, workplace, and corporate citizenship. HBR also found that high-reputation companies have higher returns and excel on other key measures investors use to assess corporate performance.”